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Agriculture

  • Bronson FFA Alumni Food Fest Friday

       The Bronson FFA Alumni Organization's Annual Food Fest will be Friday, March 2, at First Baptist Church in Bronson, with entertainment beginning at 5 p.m. and food service at 5:30 p.m.
       There will also be a singing group from the local Cowboy Church, a cake auction, a silent auction and door prizes.
    Tickets for the event may be purchased in advance for $10 or for $15 at the event. Proceeds go to the Bronson FFA Alumni Scholarship Program and to send local students to leadership conferences.

  • Levy can protest farm agency closing on Friday

    Farmers and ranchers are being invited to attend a meeting on Friday, Feb. 3, at 10 a.m. to discuss a proposal to consolidate USDA Farm Service Agencies in the tri-county area into one office in Trenton.
    The move is part of a U.S. Department of Agriculture move to trim its budget and consolidate 131 county offices in 32 states. The moves would leave more than 2,100 FSA offices remaining throughout the United States.

  • Chiefland FFA chili cook-off, cake auction Friday

    The Chiefland FFA Alumni are having their 3rd Annual Homemade Chili Cook-Off on Friday, Feb. 3, at the Chiefland High School Ag. Building.  Cost is $15 per entry and this also includes the hot dog/chili meal.
    Check-in time for entrants is 4:45 p.m., with a minimum of one gallon of chili. Prizes will be awarded.  Hot dog/chili meals will be sold to the general public for $5, beginning at 5:30.  

  • Integrating Land and Wildlife Management Workshop Series

     Workshop 3:Quail and Timber—

    Managing Your Timber to Benefit Bobwhite Quail

     

    n WHEN: Monday, Nov. 28,

    5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

    n WHERE: Levy County Extension Office

    625 N. Hathaway Ave., Bronson

    n COST: $5 Registration Fee (Dinner Included)

    To Register, call (352) 486-5131 or email ewillcox@ufl.edu.

  • USDA invests in Florida farmers

    By JOHN CRABTREE
    Center for Rural Affairs

    Florida farmers transitioning to organic systems as well as established organic producers now have an opportunity to apply for Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) Organic Initiative funding to assist their organic efforts.

  • Bee hive basics

    Whether one wants free honey or to help restore the declining bee population, people everywhere can learn how to raise bees from the numerous online articles about beekeeping.
    Mother Earth News and even The New York Times had a piece about urban beekeeping on city roof tops. “Bee Movie,” was a hit for adults and kids alike. Some Florida municipalities are revising their zoning laws to accommodate small scale beekeepers.

  • Bee enthusiasts gather in Chiefland

    There’s a new gang in town. And while some of its members have made the ‘A’ list, they’re all on the ‘bee’ list.
    The Levy County Beekeepers Association was formed last week in Chiefland. About a dozen local residents came to the club’s first meeting where officers were appointed and membership dues, $20 per member, were collected.

  • Division of Forrestry announces longleaf pine ecosystem restoration

     
     The Division of Forestry at the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services announced recently the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem Restoration Landowner Incentive Program will be accepting applications from non-industrial private forest landowners Monday, April 11 through Friday, May 6.

  • Levy loggers named master loggers

    Two loggers from Levy County were recently awarded the designation of Florida Master Logger.  
    B.J. Casson and Mike Studstil, now officially Master Loggers, return to their businesses with enhanced credentials to offer logging and forestry services in this growing segment of the local and state economy.

  • Earthquake may hinder grain trade with Japan

    Special to the Citizen

    The U.S. Grains Council received initial reports that the earthquake and subsequent tsunami may have caused significant damage to many of Japan’s agricultural facilities and production areas.
    While the extent of the damage is not yet known, it will likely impact grain trade.