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Savvy Set

  • Social Security Question and Answer for October

    Question:
       How do I update or correct the name on my Social Security card?

    Answer:
       To update or correct the name on your Social Security card:
    Complete an Application for A Social Security Card (Form SS-5), available at www.socialsecurity.gov/online/ss-5.pdf; Show us original documents proving your legal name change, identity and U.S. citizenship (if you have not already established your citizenship with us), or immigration status if you are not a U.S. citizen; and

  • Medicare 2012 enrollment begins Saturday, closes Dec. 7

       SHINE, a volunteer program with the Florida Department of Elder Affairs is going on tour in the Tri-county area to help retirees make the best informed decision for the 2012 Medicare Part D Drug Plan or Medicare Advantage Plan.  
       Each site listed will have a short presentation followed by individual counseling.  SHINE provides free, unbiased and confidential counseling.
       Low-Income Medicare beneficiaries should ask about Extra Help (LIS) to help pay for 2012  Medicare Prescription Drug Plan costs.

  • Social Security Question and Answer

    By ALICE MOSES-TURNER
    Social Security District Manager, Gainesville

     Question:
    Is it true I must now receive my benefits through direct deposit?
    Answer:

  • Everything you wanted to know about Medicare but were afraid to ask:

    • How does Medicare work?
    • What Part D plan saves me the most money?
    • Where do I find supplemental insurance rates?
    • How does my employer's insurance work with Medicare?
    • Are there any programs to help pay for my PArt B premiums?
    • Are there any programs to help pay for my drug costs?
    Want to know the answers to these questions? Come see SHINE, a volunteer program with the Florida Department of Elder Affairs. For more information, call 1-800-262-2243.

    SHINE meeting schedule:

  • Get prepared before hitting doughnut hole

    By FRANK BAILEY
    AARP Director of Health

     A quarter-million Floridians age 65-plus will bite into Medicare’s “Doughnut Hole” in 2011.
    It’s not a treat.  The “Doughnut Hole” is another name for the coverage gap in Medicare’s Part D prescription drug benefit.  Medicare, the federal health insurance program for people 65 and older and for some younger persons with disabilities, offers coverage to help people pay for their prescription drugs.

  • Nosey says ...

    We can't allow Medicare to be replaced by private insurance. Paul Ryan, the House Budget Committee Chairman from Wisconsin, has been pushing a bill to give seniors financial aid to purchase private insurance.

  • Obama’s deficit plan sets up battle on Medicare, Medicaid cuts

    By TAMARA LYTLE
    AARP News
    President Obama on Wednesday laid out a vastly different vision of how to wrestle the nation’s debt problems into submission compared with a Republican plan that comes up for a vote later this week.
    “Doing nothing on the deficit is just not an option,” Obama told a crowd at George Washington University. “Our debt has grown so large that we could do real damage to the economy if we don’t begin a process now to get our fiscal house in order.”

  • AARP responds to President’s speech on fiscal issues

    WASHINGTON — AARP CEO A. Barry Rand released this statement in response to the speech by the President addressing the nation’s fiscal challenges:

  • Nosey says ...

    The Medicare Fraud Squad is here and needs your help. On a national level about 3 percent of all healthcare spending, some $86 billion, is lost to fraude each and every year.
    Because Florida has one of the largest senior populations with over 3 million beneficiaries, Medicare fraud costs taxpayers betwen $3 and $4 billion each year.
    And when you consider Florida’s Medicare program runs in excess of $176 billion annually, this has really got to hurt.

  • Social Security

    Class is in
    session with Social Security webinars
    You’ve probably been on the web, and it’s likely that you’ve attended a seminar. But, have you ever attended a “webinar?” We recommend that you do.
    Social Security offers a selection of webinars at www.socialsecurity.gov/webinars. You’re invited to attend any of them, anytime. Class is always in session — past webinars are available for you to view at any time. The information can be valuable, but the cost is free.