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Waste Pro helps folks overwhelmed by too much stuff

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By The Staff

It has been a couple of hot, sweaty Saturdays, but the employees of Waste Pro in Chiefland know they have helped folks who were in a fix.

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Mostly, it's folks who have found themselves with a lot of stuff on their property.

As a community service, the crews at Waste Pro have been choosing one project every three months and helping folks mired in stuff clean up their property.

Bob Wolk, division manager at Waste Pro's Levy County operation, said his crews were looking to adopt a county  where they could pick up trash. But the county's roads have been spoken for by prison inmate crews.

In a conversation with Ted Parada, code enforcement officer for Levy County, Wolk hit on a good idea for his company's community service: clean up the yards of people facing citations and fines.

The first project was on June 13, when the temperature and humidity were high. John Scheider and Joe Lee led a crew with other workers as they used a giant claw to pick up debris, furniture and just plain junk from the site on Northeast 128th Lane.

Before the crew arrived, the property owner had hauled off about 1,000 tires to the Alachua County transfer station.

At one time, the homestead had been home to an auto repair business.

So, it was on Aug. 28 when Wolk and his crew went out again and worked on Christy Laken's property in Trenton demolishing an old building that was an attractive nusiance that held danger for local children.

The crew took down the building and hauled away trash left at the site.

The satisfaction of doing a good deed may be priceless, but Wolk says both jobs have a monetary value — the savings to the property owners.

In the June job, the labor cost would have been $1,100, the disposal of 37.91 tons of useless goods was $2,274.60, and the equipment rental would have been $495.25 for a total os $3,896.85.

The most recent job had $400 in labor, $750 in disposal fees and $600 in equipment.

And Wolk is checking with the code enforcement office for someone else to help and keep out of trouble in their next quarterly community service day.